Sterne Kessler Building Interior

Matthew K. Knabel, Ph.D.

Student Associate
Matthew K. Knabel, Ph.D.

Matthew K. Knabel, Ph.D., is a student associate in Sterne Kessler’s Biotechnology & Chemical Practice Group. Matthew’s practice includes preparing and prosecuting U.S. and foreign patent applications, conducting freedom-to-operate analyses, due diligence analyses, patentability analyses, and invalidity analyses - all in the areas of molecular biology and genetics.

While earning his Ph.D., Matthew examined the functional results of microRNA dysregulation in liver fibrosis and cirrhosis and identified key regulatory genes (miR-29a, miR-214, and miR-199a) that control extracellular matrix protein production and mitigated mesenchymal cell expression. He further demonstrated the spatial and temporal cellular expression of miR-29a, miR-214, and miR-199a during liver disease and pinpointed downstream targets of each gene. For his work on miR-214's relationship with Twist-1, Matthew won first place at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Department of Surgery Research Poster Session.

Matthew also is first author for a book chapter, Intellectual Property Protection for Synthetic Biology, Including Bioinformatics and Computational Intelligence, in Big Data Analytics in Bioinformatics and Healthcare (October, 2014. IGI Global) regarding intellectual property protection in the areas of synthetic biology and bioinformatics. 

Prior to joining Sterne Kessler, Matthew was a patent agent at a general practice law firm in Washington D.C.

Matthew is a 2018 J.D. candidate at The George Washington University Law School. He received his Ph.D. in molecular biology & human genetics from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and his B.A. in biology from The Johns Hopkins University.

Technical Publications

  • Knabel MK, Ramachandran K, Karhadkar S, Hwang HW, Creamer TJ, Chivukula RR, Sheikh F, Clark KR, Torbenson M, Montgomery RA, Cameron AM, Mendell JT, Warren DS, Systemic Delivery of scAAV8-Encoded MiR-29a Ameliorates Hepatic Fibrosis in Carbon Tetrachloride-Treated Mice. PLoS One. 2015 Apr 29;10(4).
  • Knabel, MK, Doering, K, Fernandez, DS, Intellectual Property Protection for Synthetic Biology, Including Bioinformatics and Computational Intelligence. Big Data Analytics in Bioinformatics and Healthcare. October, 2014. IGI Global.
  • Luo W, Hu H, Chang R, Zhong J, Knabel MK, O'Meally R, Cole RN, Pandey A, Semenza GL, Pyruvate kinase M2 is a PHD3-stimulated coactivator for hypoxia-inducible factor 1. Cell. 2011 May 27;145(5):732-44.
  • Mark AL, Sun Z, Warren DS, Lonze BE, Knabel MK, Melville Williams GM, Locke JE, Montgomery RA, Cameron AM, Stem cell mobilization is life saving in an animal model of acute liver failure. Ann Surg. 2010 Oct;252(4):591-6.
  • Kurbanov F, Kim Y, Latanich R, Chaudhari P, El-Diwany R, Knabel MK, Kandathil AJ, Cameron A, Cox A, Jang YY, Thomas DL, Balagopal A, IFNL3 genotype is associated with differential induction of IFNL3 in primary human hepatocytes. Antivir Ther. 2015;20(8):805-14.

Contact Information

Phone Number

Education

J.D.
Candidate (2018)
The George Washington University Law School
Ph.D.
Molecular Biology & Human Genetics
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
B.A.
Biology
The Johns Hopkins University

Admissions

United States Patent & Trademark Office